Aaron Hofeling

Oversees business development and relates to everyone

"... if it can be thought, it can be done, a problem can be overcome." – E.A. Bucchianeri

Aaron Hofeling,
Business Development Executive

CHARISMATIC, ENGAGING, CARING

Aaron Hofeling serves as Business Development Executive, where he is responsible for advancing the business, managing client relationships, overseeing account strategy, ensuring customer satisfaction and monitoring project timelines. Since joining the organization in 2012, Aaron has worked directly with a number of key clients across multiple industries. With a background in advertising, he has more than seven years of experience in managing and developing client relationships, and offers deep expertise in account management, business development and marketing communications. Prior to his current role, Aaron worked at Sandhills Publishing from 2005 to 2012, managing more than 280 accounts and collaborating with clients to develop effective advertising strategies that coincided with print and online products the organization offered. He holds a Bachelor of Journalism from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

Aaron is an outdoor aficionado. He loves all things hunting, fishing and camping. His idea of relaxing is sitting on a dock with his fishing pole. Some of his favorite times include taking his dog for a hike in the woods. He considers himself an early bird since he’s gotta catch the worm to bait the hook. His favorite food is Sushi, naturally. As much as he loves the outdoors, he also loves video games. His mother is his own personal hero—primarily for putting up with him. Aaron engages people from all walks of life and is one of the nicest guys you’ll ever meet. He loves to have a good time and has lived all over the Midwest, including Nebraska, Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas and Colorado.


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